From unidirectional to bidirectional information flows (MSN's Simple Sharing Extensions for RSS)

From the FAQ

Simple Sharing Extensions (SSE) is a specification that extends RSS from unidirectional to bidirectional information flows.

SSE defines the minimum extensions necessary to enable loosely cooperating applications to use RSS as the basis for item sharing—that is, the bidirectional, asynchronous replication of new and changed items among two or more cross-subscribed feeds.

For example, SSE could be used to share your work calendar with your spouse. If your calendar were published to an SSE feed, changes to your work calendar could be replicated to your spouse’s calendar, and vice versa. As a result, your spouse could see your work schedule and add new appointments, such as a parent-teacher meeting at the school, or a doctor’s appointment.

SSE allows you to replicate any set of independent items (for example, calendar entries, lists of contacts, list of favorites, blogrolls) using simple RSS semantics. If you can publish your data as an RSS feed, the simple addition of SSE will allow you to replicate your data to any other application that implements the SSE specification.

From the SSE Specification, version 0.9 (November 1, 2005)

The objective of Simple Sharing Extensions (SSE) is to define the minimum extensions necessary to enable loosely-cooperating apps

  1. to use RSS as the basis for item sharing – that is, the bi-directional, asynchronous replication of new and changed items amongst two or more cross-subscribed feeds.
  2. to use OPML as the basis for outline sharing – that is, the bi-directional, asynchronous replication of outlines, such as RSS aggregators subscription lists

Simple Sharing extends the Really Simple Syndication (RSS) 2.0 and Outline Processor Markup Language (OPML) 1.0 specifications.

[…] Microsoft’s copyrights in this specification are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License (version 2.5).

Via Ray Ozzie and Nicolas.

The only criticism I saw so far came from Danny Ayers who works on Atom.

Different and not feed related, but in the same order of ideas: Timetracking with the Semantic Web by Rickard Öberg

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